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Online BS in Philosophy, Politics and Economics: Curriculum

Curriculum Details

120 TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED

The online PPE courses required to complete this degree program can be completed in 2-4 years and equip you with the skills to launch an impactful career.

The core PPE curriculum consists of 15 courses, such as Principles of Microeconomics, American Political Thought and Business Ethics. Only five of these 15 PPE courses are required, with the rest of your 60 hours of general education curriculum left up to you. You’ll graduate with a variety of career options as you pursue your passion for reshaping the world.

Choose three of the following:

A multidisciplinary approach to the following questions: The competing paradigms of environmental science; historical roots of the environmental predicament, animal rights, preservation of species, obligations to future generations, population issues, pollution issues, regulatory issues and the ideal of a sustainable society. Students who have taken PHL 314 may not enroll in PHL 214 and vice-versa. Prerequisite: PHL 101; corequisite: BIO 110 (or designated semester).

An intensive consideration of some major problems in ethics or an in-depth study of some figure(s) in the history of ethics. Prerequisites: PHL 101/190 and a lower-division course.

The consideration and application of moral principles to the problems and conduct of medical professionals. Topics include professional relationships, management of medical information, reproductive technologies, abortion, end-of-life decisions, AIDS, human genetics and justice in the distribution of heath care. Preference is given to pre-medical students. Prerequisites: PHL 101/190 and a lower-division course.

An examination of major ethical theories and their application to the professional problems and conduct of persons engaged in business and management. Prerequisites: PHL 101/190.

A study of classical and contemporary ethical theories. Topics may include ethical relativism, ethical egoism, utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, feminism, moral realism, natural rights and justice. Prerequisites: PHL 101/190 and a lower-division course.

An examination of the nature of justice from a number of classic and contemporary philosophical perspectives. Readings drawn from Aristotle, Marx, Darwin, Rawls, Nozick and contemporary philosophers. Prerequisites: PHL 101/190 and a lower-division course.

An examination of the nature of law and morality, liberty, justice, equality and punishment. Contemporary social issues such as the right to privacy, obscenity and pornography, capital punishment, equality between the sexes are also discussed. Prerequisites: PHL 101/190 and a lower-division course.

The Western tradition of philosophical discourse on politics is explored in its major moments — classical, medieval and modern — through an intensive study of selected classics in the field. Works studied in the first semester include Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Politics and St. Thomas’ Treatise on Law. The second semester is devoted to the classics of modern political philosophy, including Machiavelli’s Prince, Rousseau’s Social Contract and Mills’ On Liberty. Same course as PHL 351 and 352. Prerequisite: Sophomore   standing.

Choose three of the following:

An analysis of the development, organization, role and influence of political parties and pressure groups in the United States; summary of recent work on public opinion, attitudes and voting behavior, relation of parties and elections to policy outcomes.

An overview of the U.S. foreign policy process and its role in multilateral institutions. Experiential learning includes participation in a simulation of a foreign policy crisis and the writing of a briefing paper. Prerequisite: POL 112 or POL 161.

A survey of major public policy issues such as health care, education, crime, immigration, welfare reform and economic problems in the United States. Prerequisite: POL 112.

A study of the characteristics of public administration, its political context and policy-making role and the problems and techniques of public-sector leadership. Prerequisite: POL 112.

Nature and scope of American constitutional principles developed by the Supreme Court: federalism, separation of powers, taxing and commerce powers and the presidency. Case method. Prerequisite: POL 112 or POL 283.

An examination of the organization, procedures and judicial decision-making process in the United States federal court system. Prerequisite: POL 112.

 Nature and scope of American civil liberties and civil rights as developed by the Supreme Court: particular attention to freedom of speech and religion, due process and equal protection. Case method. Prerequisite: POL 112 or POL 283.

A writing-intensive seminar that probes major themes and issues in the study of public health with attention to international cooperation and human rights. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

An analysis of international relations in combination with political economy. The course explores the development of a world economic system and the complex synergy among political and economic forces in the world. Prerequisite: POL 151 or POL 161.

The Western tradition of philosophical discourse on politics is explored in its major moments — classical, medieval and modern — through an intensive study of selected classics in the field. Works studied in the first semester include Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Politics and St. Thomas’ Treatise on Law. The second semester is devoted to the classics of modern political philosophy, including Machiavelli’s Prince, Rousseau’s Social Contract and Mills’ On Liberty. Same course as PHL 351 and 352. Prerequisite: Sophomore   standing.

Contemporary Christians face complex social realities increasingly hostile to human flourishing, owing to the industrial and technological revolutions, capitalism, consumerism and globalization. This course explores some of the pivotal documents in the Catholic response to these developments, the social problems underlying these documents, and the stories of persons whose lives were informed by this tradition. Same course as THL 350. Prerequisite: THL 101.

A study of Marx and other major figures who have shaped twentieth century political thought: Freud, Marcuse and writers on Liberation Theology. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Study of political ideologies, with an emphasis on the major ideologies of the contemporary US, including modern liberalism, conservatism, libertarianism and populism. Historical development of ideologies and their relationship to public opinion and political psychology are also explored. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Choose one of the following:

Theory of demand and value, pricing, production, resource allocation and general equilibrium.

A study of theories and issues underlying international trade and finance. Topics include sources of comparative advantage, tariff and nontariff barriers and multilateral institutions. Students will also study the balance of payments, exchange rates and the impact of government policy.

A study of the operations and roles of the major participants in the financial system and the factors influencing them. Topics include: financial institutions, central banking, monetary policy, interest rates, financial markets, financial innovation and regulatory reform.

This course involves an extensive discussion of capitalism and socialism, including the various permutations and sub-types of each theory. Students will explore which economic system best promotes social justice, possible moral limitations of free markets, and potential for synthesizing the productivity and efficiency of capitalism with the Jesuit and Catholic commitment to serve others.

This course begins with a close look at the Scottish Enlightenment of the 18th Century, when thinkers such as David Hume and Adam Smith first systematically discussed “commercial society” (nowadays termed “capitalism” or “liberal democracy”).  The course then traces the key political and economic developments of the subsequent 250 years, as free-market ideas extended in influence well beyond their Anglo-American roots.  Among themes explored: the philosophical justifications for and against government regulation; the evolution of key constitutional and legal institutions related to private property and contracts; the social effects of trade, consumption and competition.

Choose one of the following:

The content of the seminar will rotate each year among the following areas: philosophical anthropology, ethical theory, metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of God, philosophy of science, philosophy of language, philosophy of law.

Study of American politics at an advanced level; the senior seminar in political science.

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