Skip to content

Online Interdisciplinary Studies Program: Curriculum

Curriculum Details

120 TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED

The IDS online courses at Spring Hill College can be completed in 2-4 years and prepare you for a variety of careers by harnessing your versatility and intellectual curiosity.

The diverse curriculum consists of 20 core courses, such as English Composition, Introductory Logic, Social Science and Applications in Computer Information Systems. You have the option of integrating two or more disciplines, positioning you for a specific postgraduate path. You’ll graduate with a flexible degree that will afford you the opportunity to either further your education or embark on an exciting career.

Core Courses

An introduction to the Windows-based applications used for solving business and non-business problems. Emphasis is placed on spreadsheets using Excel, word processing using Word, presentation design using PowerPoint and database design using Access. Substantial Windows lab work will be required. Ethical issues in computer applications are addressed.
This course cultivates the intensive reading and analytical writing skills necessary for college-level work. Texts are drawn from across the disciplines to cultivate wide-ranging vocabularies and varied analytical approaches.
This course expands on skills cultivated in ENG 121 by training students to place their ideas within a larger intellectual context by locating, evaluating, and integrating outside research into their writing with appropriate documentation.
A writing course, at an advanced level, that focuses on the research process in relation to readings from the Classical period through the 18th century. Works might include Homer, Virgil, Sophocles, Aeschylus, Dante, Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton and Aphra Behn.
A study, at an advanced level, of major works of British, American, and world literature from the 19th century to the present. Representative works might include Jane Austen, the Romantic and Victorian poets, Dickens, Hardy, T. S. Eliot, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Achebe, Conrad, Fugard, Dostoevsky, Robert Frost, Jamaica Kincaid, Toni Morrison, August Wilson and others.
An introductory course on historical skills, including: critical reading, writing and thinking, thesis statements, geographical awareness, oral communication and distinguishing between primary and secondary sources. Each course will have a subtitle which would indicate the subject content of the course. This course fulfills one-half of a student’s oral communication overlay requirement.
An introductory course on historical skills, including critical reading, writing and thinking, thesis statements, geographical awareness, oral communication and distinguishing between primary and secondary sources. Each course will have a subtitle which would indicate the subject content of the course, which will focus on an American history topic. This course fulfills one-half of a student’s oral communication overlay requirement.
A survey of Western civilization from the Classical Period to the mid-1600s. Emphasis is given to Classical Greece, the Hellenistic Age, Roman History, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation and the rise of the nation states. Political, social and economic relationships are integrated and analyzed.
A survey of Western civilization from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Emphasis is given to the Scientific Revolution; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; industrialization; political, social, and intellectual changes in the nineteenth century; the Russian Revolution; the World Wars; the Cold War and the collapse of Communism. Political, social and economic relationships are integrated and analyzed.
An inquiry into the development of American society through the Civil War and Reconstruction.
An inquiry into America’s development since 1876 including the Gilded Age, Progressivism, the Great Depression, both world wars, Vietnam and the many diverse social and political developments from the 1950s into the 1990s.
This course provides sound methods for distinguishing good from bad reasoning through the study of the basic methods of formal or symbolic logic. Techniques covered include: symbolization, truth tables and method of deduction for sentential logic. Possible additional topics include: classical syllogistic logic, Venn diagrams for predicate logic, issues of logic embedded in language.
This is an accelerated course in investigating sound methods for distinguishing good from bad reasoning through the study of the basic methods of formal or symbolic logic. Techniques covered include: symbolization, truth tables, and natural deduction proof methods for sentential logic. Possible additional topics for this honors course may include: predicate logic, modal logic, issues in the philosophy of logic, mathematics and language, the application of the techniques of logic to the analysis of difficult philosophical problems.
 A comprehensive survey of the basic elements of American political life, national government and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.
An introductory-level survey that compares states, political regimes and patterns of violence across several diverse countries in the world. The empirical emphasis is on contemporary issues and problems.
 Introduction to principles of international relationships and major contemporary global issues. Topics covered focus on issues that are important for understanding common good of the global community, including the growth of the state system, human rights, globalization, conflict and war, trade and money, North-South relations and environmental problems.
An introduction to the theological study of the Christian tradition of faith. The course is divided into two components: biblical and doctrinal. Both components will investigate the historical development and contemporary understandings of Bible and Tradition, the two fundamental expressions of Christianity.
An introduction to the theological study of the Christian tradition designed especially for Honors students. The course has two components: the study of Scripture in the light of contemporary biblical scholarship and the study of leading figures and turning points in the history of doctrine.
A multi-genre introduction to creative writing covering poetry, drama, and fiction.

Interdisciplinary Courses

Interdisciplinary special topics. The course will be taught either on a tutorial or seminar basis.
Students are introduced to the role culture plays in forming the ways people think, identify themselves, interact and make decisions. Various culture groups are compared and contrasted in order to understand their different values, social behaviors, and traditions. The relationship between culture and language is also examined.
Professional experience through a semester of directed part-time employment. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.
An integrating course intended primarily for interdisciplinary studies majors at the end of their program. The course will be taught either on a tutorial or seminar basis.
An integrating course intended primarily for interdisciplinary studies majors at the end of their program. The course will be taught either on a tutorial or seminar basis.

Request More Information

We appreciate your interest in Spring Hill College, and we’d be happy to share more information about us and the program you are interested in. Complete the form and someone will be in touch shortly to discuss your goals and how we can help.

All fields required